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A Huge Horse Statue Stolen from a School in Reading » Get Man and Van

A Huge Horse Statue Stolen from a School in Reading

Author: Kim Jacobs All about moving and London

The staff and students of Copse Primary School in Reading were quite surprised to find out that the life-size statue of a horse that has been a decoration of their school’s field has mysteriously disappeared during the night. The statue, with dimensions with a length of over 2 meters has been stolen from the school’s property by unknown men during the night.
Reading stationThe horse was the pride of both pupils and teachers, because its colorful decoration was done namely by them. The local Thames Valley police is investigating the crime, but up to this moment little can be said about the motives of the thieves as well as the manner in which they have managed to conduct their hideous crime. It is save to suggest that men with a van come on the school’s property in the night of the crime and managed to lift up, load the statue and drive off without causing any suspicion from the school guard. A local resident has even jokingly referred to the incident as “the best advertisement of local man and van removal services we have had in a long time”.
The statue of the horse itself was given to Copse Primary school by the Newbury Racecourse foundation. It was initially white in color. As a part of a competition held by the foundation, it has been painted in the colors of the World Cup by the children, who were all really excited by the idea and has carried out the task willingly and with much joy.
The kids even won the competition with a price of 500 pounds. The already decorated statue has been given an honorary place in the school’s yard and has already achieved the status of a mascot. Well, or at least that was the case until it has been stolen several nights ago.
The school’s caretakers were equally baffled and angered when they discovered the theft. “The children worked really hard to paint it and it was a lovely conversation piece to have in the school grounds.” Mr Miclewhite has been reported to have said. According to him the horse has been anchored by its feet to the ground and was pretty heavy.
With all the information concerning the theft now available it can easily deduced that this crime is not an ordinary manifestation of vandalism. Its conduct requires much planning and effort in order to be completed, so it is safe to assume that the thieves have carefully planned and executed the deed. Their reasons however remain a mystery. Who is going to need a painted horse statue and what for? More importantly, who would want to rob ordinary school children from the joy of looking at the results of their collective productive effort? All that we are left with to hope for is that the police will do their job right and catch the perpetrators. And that the local community will not have to make the news for such ridiculous yet alarming deeds anymore.